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i'm back in the cancer again


On Friday afternoon, I got the call...

You've got cancer.

I find myself again - sucked into the world of cancer. Surprise... it's back! I guess this was one way to get me back to update my blog!

Yes, all those doctors who thought I was being a giant pain in their butt and didn't know what I was talking about when I push and argued to get the biopsy done... well, I get to say "I told you so." I wish it felt better to say, but I was really hoping for I told you I had that weird autoimmune issue (I was thinking lupus... but we will wait on that one).

And for those who don't realize how hard I had to advocate to get the biopsy, check out my three blog entries before this one which has a detailed explanation of how I have had to deal with doctors all saying they didn't think I had anything wrong with me - and it was not cancer or breast cancer. It is also important because my self-advocacy and persistence may have actually saved my life.

Let's get into what we know & what we don't:

I have Breast Cancer again, but not like my first Breast Cancer. I have a whole new Breast Cancer. Yep, that is a new one for me. I have heard of Mets, Secondary, & Recurrence Cancers - I was told by doctors (10 years ago when I started my 1st cancer journey), when it comes back it usually comes back with the same feeders.

My original cancer was Estrogen +, Progesterone +, and HER2 -. That basically means my hormones were feeding the cancer. 

This time I am Estrogen -, Progesterone -, and we aren't sure about HER2 yet. Basically, that test came up a level 2 which means it may or may not be + or -. So, they are sending off my tissue for additional tests. I won't know for 2 weeks... more waiting!

I have a completely different type of breast cancer in 2023 than I did in 2013.


If this couldn't get any odder... it does...

I do not have a mass or tumor. This is another area that stumps the doctors. They aren't sure where it came from - was it just my breast tissue that has it or did it start in the lymph nodes or do I have a mass the mammogram missed? This is not common. I am getting an MRI soon to find out if there is maybe a mass somewhere that is hidden away. So, this is a mystery.


What does all that mean?

I have a whole new primary breast cancer. I now have what is called - Multiple Primary Malignancies:

multiple primary malignancies, refer to two or more different primary cancers in the same patient occurring in the same or different organs or tissues

Of course it is rare... I can't do anything normal. 

Where do I go from here?

I can't start any treatment yet. Once I know if I am HER2 - or HER2 + I will know what type of chemotherapy will be most effective. I do know I am headed for a new cancer journey of chemotherapy, surgeries, and radiation. I will be visiting breast surgeons, oncologists, heart doctors, radiation oncologists, and a few more doctors I can't even think of right now. 

It means I get to start my cancer journey all over again...




Musical Reference for the Title: I'm Back in the Saddle Again by Aerosmith

Comments

  1. Thanks for sharing your journey Amy. I cannot even imagine what you are going through. Know that we live you❤️❤️❤️ cass

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