My cancer saga started when I was diagnosed at 38 with Stage 3 Invasive Ductal Carcinoma. I have a twisted sense of humor and have tried to continue with laughter and optimism on my journey...

Triappointments... CT/OT/BoneScan

Episode XCIX - I've been looking so long at these pictures of you...


My 3rd, 4th, & 5th appointments on the December Doctor Madness tour all happened today and the first one was early. I had to rush everyone in the house to keep on task and to keep moving... we were going to be late!

Run. Run. Run. Hurry. Hurry. Hurry. 



Take the selfie and run...


The first appointment was an abdominal and pelvic CT scan. Since it requires prep I had to get up extra early to start my barium drink. Already not liking this! Then I would need to keep one handy, because I would be drinking the second container while I was driving. Already hoping I do not forget this!


Breakfast & lunch in my case...


So my morning was insane. I needed to keep up with my time frame of drinking the barium. I needed to make sure the kids got up and ready... and on time! I needed to drive my daughter to a friends to take her to school and drive my son to his carpool pick up location. My husband would have to fend for himself. Plus, I must remember to drink the remaining part of the barium in the car. And to not be late for the appointment... hurry?!?!?!?!

Surprisingly I actually made it. And I made it on time. Miracle!

My day was going to be an all day cancer center event. I had a CT scan, OT appointment, and bone scan all lined up. I was going to be have so many pictures made of my body today. Pictures of my innards and some of my bones. It was like Scanfest 2014!


CAT Scan & Bone Scan... I will be here all day...


When I arrived at the center I went straight to the imaging department and waited to be called. I knew what was going to happen since I did this just like a few months. Nice already being experienced!

First they put in an IV to do the contrast for the CT scan, as well as to inject the tracer for the bone scan. Thank goodness the nurses here are so good. I have tricky veins and even though there was some digging around she was quick!

Then I went back to the CT room and laid down on the table. The one really good thing about CT scans are they are fast... really fast. Just a few moments of holding your breath. Just a few times back and forth in the giant doughnut shaped machine. A slight feeling that you have gone to the bathroom on yourself when the contrast is released. Then a few more breath holds and passes... IV is removed. Done!

I was not really done. I was just finished with the CT. My next appointment was down the hall, up the elevator, and down another hall. Conveniently located and strategically planned by me. Since the CT scan was so fast I would be a few minutes early to my OT appointment. Not early enough to eat, but just enough time to sit outside the door and be distracting by my cell phone!


9. occupy boredom in waiting rooms
10. know where to be at any given time


My second appointment of the day was spent getting getting a manual lymph drainage massage ("boobie massage"). It was weird because my normal OT was not there. I had another OT performing the massage. It was strange how different each person's touch and approach can be. While it was similar, the order that she went and the areas that she focused on were not the same. She really focused on my arm and forearm. Even though it was different we still talked, laughed, and hurried because I had an appointment for a bone scan right afterwards.

Run. Run. Run. Hurry. Hurry. Hurry.

I reversed my steps and rushed to the imaging department. My OT appointment ended as my Bone Scan appointment began. I was ready for my final, third, and most time consuming appointment of the day. Scan on this!

The bone scan requires me to be still. A feat in and of itself. It also requires me to be still while laying on a very flat metal table... my back!!! Seriously, even with that tiny little knee pillow you give me... ouch! Can they not afford to make more comfortable tables for these tests???

My arms were placed in a circular strap to stay in place. My body was still. Now the machine moved me into the starting position and began to find its way as close to me as possible. Each section, starting with my face, is scanned for about 15 minutes. It is really close to your face... inches away. As it moves you further out, it stays as close to you as possible. And it is really close!

I was able to see some of my scan on the screen above me. It was really cool... there were all my bones... all shiny and white on the black background. Of course, I have no idea what any of it means... but it looks cool!

The scan technician made sure there are no fuzzy bones. I did not have any because I did not move. I was clear to leave. I was really done! I had spent all morning and now into the afternoon at the cancer center and all I could think about was getting home to eat something. It was a long, exhausting day... but my pictures for the next months to year were complete!


Seriously?!?!


Something would have to go weird... it was too easy today. After I got home, ate, and picked up the kids I looked at my arm... red! The paperwork they gave me says to call the doctor if there is a red spot, but I am just too tired to deal with it. Plus, I think some contrast must have gotten under my skin near the IV area. I will call tomorrow if it is still red... argh!!!


In my head...


Just as I suspected, the redness went away by the next day. However, my body was sore and it continued into the next day. Each of those things: CT, OT, Bone Scan are simple and easy... doing them in marathon form was exhausting! However, I was glad to get them all done and I got them in before the end of the year. Less expensive for me!!!

At least my first week of appointments in December was over. While I still have other things to do I am done with the medical... until Tuesday...


"It is difficult to see the picture when you are inside the frame."
- Eugene Kleiner


Episode Reference: Picture of You, The Cure song

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About Amy Brock

Amy Brock is a cancer fighter and survivor. Diagnosed with Infiltrating Breast Cancer at 38 she has gone through chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, hormone therapy, and other procedures since 2013. Post treatment she has been diagnosed with lymphedema, chemo-induced neuropathy and bone degeneration in her back, as well as other issues including dysphagia, bilateral hearing loss, and arthritis. From being completely healthy, to having a variety of issues, Amy began blogging about her experiences as a way to help others. Read more about finding humor in the craziness of cancer at her blog www.tatawarrior.com Amy is the mother of two children and has worked for various non-profit agencies. In addition, she is a fine artist creating works in multiple mediums which can be seen at www.amybrock.com

1 comments:

  1. Amazing that you had the strength and endurance to get all of this accomplished before the end of the year. I can't believe you did all that in one day!

    ReplyDelete