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Doctors, art, and other things

Episode LXXXIII - It's times like these...


I was back to the Breast Surgeon. It was hard to believe that it had been six months. Wow!!! Really, six months since I had seen him?


Off to the surgeons...


The visit was exactly what I expected... not much other than a breast exam. I had already gotten my mammogram results at the end of May, so we discussed that I looked good any way. My breast tissue looked like it was healing well. In all honesty, the multiple OT massages were helping break up the scar tissue left from the lumpectomy. Not only were the boobie massages helping my lymphedema issues, they were really aiding in my surgery recovery too. Bonus!


Even though I am at OT multiple times a week for lymphedema treatment and still going to a variety of doctor's appointments I have found time to get back to things I love. I began painting again!

During the last year I saw an art exhibit travel through my cancer center. I told myself that I would paint something for the next competition. I happen to look at the Lilly Oncology on Canvas website and noticed that the competition was ending soon. I set out to complete a work in just a few days... I got this!!!

When I paint I like to use bold colors. And it so happens that orange represents emotional strength during difficult times. The orange bald woman was strong and up for the fight. I wanted to capture my fighting spirit. After a few day, I finished the painting and sent it off to New York. Hopefully it will travel to other cancer centers and inspire the fighter in each of us...


The Fighter, 16 x 20 Acrylic on Canvas


I continued my busy creative outlet and actually began writing some articles that are now posted on a variety of cancer websites and healthline. Obviously, I am self promoting... it is my blog... right?!?!

In honor of my fighting painting I have included the beginning of my article on that topic. Cancer has been a continual battle that even after completing treatment, I fight. There is the assumption that once treatment is over the person is healthy and well. I have learned that perspective is not always true... often the survivor is still fighting.

The term fighting is frequently associated with cancer. It is often seen as a fight to survive the illness. Putting on your gloves and beating cancer.

But the fight goes so far beyond that. It goes further than I ever imagined it could. Before cancer, I would see the bumper stickers with “survivor” written within the ribbon. I knew that those people survived. They fought and beat cancer. Now I realize that it is so much more than that. I now have a new, deeper understanding of the fight to being a survivor.
Read More about My Take on Fighting Cancer and Beyond... Click Here.

In my head...


Nothing like more doctors telling you that things look good. I always enjoy those appointments and hope to have more of them in the future.

While I feel weird about promoting myself, I also hope that it will inspire others to do whatever they love. Maybe even try something new. And if it helps someone, even better. Plus it was good to do some productive things... A little bit of painting. A little bit of writing. Being creative is fun!!


“It is good to love many things, for therein lies the true strength, 
and whosoever loves much performs much, and can accomplish much, 
and what is done in love is well done.” 
- Vincent van Gogh


Episode Reference: Times Like These, Foo Fighters song

It's times like these you learn to live again

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