My cancer saga started when I was diagnosed at 38 with Stage 3 Invasive Ductal Carcinoma. I have a twisted sense of humor and have tried to continue that laughter and optimism on my journey...

Oncology Update

Good News Alert...


I had to go back to the Oncologist to hear my scan results. My appointment was right before Relay for Life so I was rocking my faux-hawk.


Me waiting on the Oncologist with my Jimmy Neutron hair...



Basically, the Oncologist said:

My bone scan was pretty clear - no cancers. Some weird bone island thing on my thigh, but nothing that warrants trouble. (I had to look up what a bone island was - "A bone island is a benign growth of bone or cartilage inside a bone, usually within the marrow.")

My CT scan seemed pretty good too. My chest was clear other than some build up where I had my recent surgery to remove the breast cancer. My liver had a couple of spots, but it seemed more fatty tissue than cancer. As far as CT scans went it looked good.


In my head...


Good news...


I did notice later, when I read a copy of the report, that the Oncologist did not mention that bilateral ovarian cysts were found. I guess he did not mention it because there was a side note that said common for my age. I know I had gone to the Gynecologist after I was diagnosed and had a ultrasound that showed no cysts. As I recall, my ovaries looked like tiny shriveled raisins due to chemo treatment.

Going to contact my Gyn and see what she wants to do (probably another ultrasound to make sure those cysts are normal). And since I have some discomforting side effects (bone pain) I am going to send my scans to another radiologist (friend of my brother) for a second glance to see if anything else could be causing it. Cancer doctors like to only look for cancer. Maybe something else was causing the pain... or it could just be Tamoxifen.

Better to be safe than sorry!!!

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About Amy Brock

Amy Brock is a cancer fighter and survivor. Diagnosed with Infiltrating Breast Cancer at 38 she has gone through chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, hormone therapy, and other procedures since 2013. Post treatment she has been diagnosed with lymphedema, chemo-induced neuropathy and bone degeneration in her back, as well as other issues including dysphagia, bilateral hearing loss, and arthritis. From being completely healthy, to having a variety of issues, Amy began blogging about her experiences as a way to help others. Read more about finding humor in the craziness of cancer at her blog www.tatawarrior.com Amy is the mother of two children and has worked for various non-profit agencies. In addition, she is a fine artist creating works in multiple mediums which can be seen at www.amybrock.com

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